Ulterior motives, good and bad

It bears repeating: we need to be savvier.

We liberals are united in standing against Trump, yet seem fragmented in what we stand for — because we do not fully understand either. We do not understand the common factors underlying the policies we oppose, and accordingly we do not understand the common factors underlying our opposition. One lens through which to gain insight into these common factors, a perspective often used on these pages: power, specifically the concentration or distribution thereof.

Take any major Republican policy — voting restrictions, reversing environmental protections, restricting abortions, for examples — and the ulterior motive is not voting integrity, industrial jobs, or protecting life. At its core, the ulterior motive is not even racism, climate change denial, or misogyny. The core is concentration of power, and those issues merely serve as convenient vehicles to achieve that goal.

Take any major response from the left — marching for voting rights, for science and climate, for women — and the issues seem distinct, yet they are united by a common purpose, too: the sharing of power or, in a word, equality.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s